Quantum Monkeys Blog

How to hire the best Agile professionals

I’m seeing a lot of job postings for agile professionals lately. However, the way they are worded and the requirements listed often do not make sense in an agile context.

In fact, a large number of them seem to be copy and pasted from a project manager job posting with the additional requirement of a scrum master certification and possibly some agile experience. If that is your case, your agile endeavor is in a heap of trouble.

The goal of this article is to shed some light on what to look for in an agile professional. There are a lot of emerging titles, certification acronyms and different frameworks out there. It is also easy for the non-initiated to see scrum masters and product owners as nothing more than traditional project managers with a fancier name.

The situation is not helped by the fact that many companies who ask for agile personnel have a limited understanding of what agility is, believing it to be simply a new delivery method involving only superficial changes.

I hope the following will shed a bit of light on how best to approach hiring agile professionals.

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By Maurice Lefebvre, ago
Quantum Monkeys Blog

Five emerging concepts in Agile

In this post, I would like to give a brief overview of five emerging tools I find interesting. I often refer to these in conversation, presentations, or blog posts and I would like this post to act as a cheat sheet of sorts.

Please keep in mind that I’m not advocating the use of these tools above the ones you might currently be using. I am not disparaging any other tools either. Context is everything, and the right tool to use will depend on that context.

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By Maurice Lefebvre, ago
Quantum Monkeys Blog

Guiding teams out of fragility

During a coaching session a few weeks ago I was asked by a client about the advantages of keeping teams together in an Agile setting. After all, they used to build teams to order for each project and it was working fine. Building teams for specific small projects and disbanding them afterward seemed like the most efficient way to go, as it meant that all specialists were exactly where they needed to be at exactly the right time.

This question is tricky to answer. Of course, the client is right: in a very narrow view, he uses his resources far more efficiently that way. But he’s also completely wrong, as the short-term gain of efficiency comes at the expense of long-term gains and of the overall strength of his entire system.

The answer is also not necessarily to keep teams completely stable over time but to understand the “why” and “how” to change team members.

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By Maurice Lefebvre, ago